According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, New Jersey had the eleventh lowest adult obesity rate in 2017.  While our state consistently ranks along the bottom in this category, it stays among the top half of the physical inactivity charts year after year.

Physical inactivity is measured by whether or not participants engaged in exercise apart from at their regular jobs during the month prior to the survey.  NJ had the third highest inactivity rate in 2016, but dropped to sixteenth in 2017, and hopefully will continue to trend downwards. View a map of physical inactivity data.

For the new year, we can expect to see some exciting fitness trends develop, and maybe us New Jerseyans will be inspired to get active and stay healthy!

  • 1

    Shorter Workouts

    While the old motto was to exercise until it hurt, and "play through the pain," people are realizing now that the potential consequences that come from overexerting your energy far outweigh the benefits.

    Past studies have shown that thirty minutes of exercise produce results comparable to hour long workouts, and in that shorter time span you're less likely to overwork yourself.  The evidence points towards smaller, high intensity workouts producing the best results, and ultimately keeping you from doing more harm than good.

  • 2

    Streaming Workouts

    Throughout the late 20th century, at home workouts exploded with the advent of VHS tapes.  Propelled by celebrities like Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons, these tapes aimed to get people active from the comfort of their own homes, for better or worse.

    The trend quickly dissipated with the arrival of chains like Planet Fitness, but for next year it might make a big comeback.  Apps and sites are starting to stream workout classes, meaning anyone with a solid internet connection can take part in them from home.

    Classes range in activities and experience levels, and are meant be followed along with, just like the old days of VHS.  The focus is on disciplines that don't require an abundance of equipment, so you'll see a lot of at-home yoga and low-impact cardio that'll help you shape up in time to head down the shore.

  • 3

    Barre

    Reading this, you may be asking "what the heck is Barre?" Well, I didn't know either, but barre is a workout program that takes influence from ballet, yoga, and other no-impact exercises that improve cardio and provide an even, full body workout.

    Recently, NFL players have taken a liking to activities like these to improve their cardio and footwork in the off season, and in 2019 we'll see even less division between men and women in the gym.  The stigmas that push many men away from dance and yoga are breaking as more realize the benefits that come with integrating them into workouts.

  • 4

    Mindfulness

    Apps that promote healthy living and a clear mental state have been popping up, and coupled with workouts can help maximize your progress.  Working out can be seen as either a stress reliever or an aggravator, but with the rise of yoga, more and more the focus is on relaxation.

    The world never stops, but apps like Headspace can help you focus more on being present and slowing down through the use of guided meditation.  This tool could prove beneficial for people looking to cool down after a workout, or manage the stress that comes from beginning a new year.

  • 5

    Ninja Warrior Gyms

    What started twenty years ago as an obstacle course competition in Japan that featured the likes of gas station attendants and fishermen, Ninja Warrior has evolved into a breeding ground for a new type of athlete.

    Based on the success of the Americanized version, gyms that emphasize its unorthodox trials of strength are beginning to pop up sporadically throughout the country.  One's already opened up in the SJ area, specifically at the Pinnacle Parkour Academy in Cherry Hill.

    The absurd obstacles are meant to improve upon strength, balance, and endurance, and are a refreshing deviation from normal workout routines.

    Source: MyFitnessPal.com