Dear National September 11 Memorial & Museum,

You've had to make some tough decisions. One of them was not publicly reading the names of the over 3,000 souls lost on 9/11. I'm kind of 50/50 on that one, but I'm glad you're playing a recording.

I have to say I was more than disappointed to learn Friday that twin beams of light would not shine in New York City as they usually do to pay tribute to those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. I am sad.

You have created a beautiful tradition and stunning visuals. To be frank, citing concerns over contracting coronavirus doesn't make sense to me.

You say that you are concerned about the health of the workers who would set up the display. As long as you're not forcing people to set up and be a part of the display, and they have the proper PPE, I don't understand why it's an issue.

Have willing participants wear hazmat suits. I bet there would be staffers lined up around huge city blocks.

Now, if you were saying that you weren't lighting the twin beams to detract large crowds from congregating around the site, that I would understand. You didn't say that, though. Not to mention the fact that the beams of light can be seen by the human eye miles and miles away. Something doesn't sit right.

I appreciate the "alternative" displays of spires and facades on buildings, but it's not the same, and just not enough.

Apparently, I'm not the only one that is not thrilled about your decision.

Here's a statement from the Mayor of Middletown.

Thank you, Mayor Perry.

National September 11 Memorial & Museum, I'm asking you to please reconsider. The last thing I or anyone else wants to see is another life lost on the site where so many have already perished. However, there absolutely is a way to safely shine the twin-beam lights into the New York night sky.

Respectfully,

Matt.Ryan@townsquaremedia.com

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