Craig Callaway and the Atlantic City Democratic Party are flexing their political muscles in a quiet, but, profound way.

As such, many potential candidates see an opening for Mayor of Atlantic City.

Before any of this electoral carrousel can play out, there is the change of government ballot question to deal with first.

Early next week, Craig Callaway will reveal his intentions regarding the ballot question exclusively on “Hurley in the Morning.”

Inside sources have confirmed to me that Pam Fields will announce her candidacy for Mayor on President’s Day at the Civil Rights Garden in Atlantic City.

Fields is a very viable candidate, who could win the Democratic Nomination, which then paves the way on General Election Day.

Another very viable possibility is Atlantic City Council President George Tibbitt.

Tibbitt has a lot of support and has the experience and popularity to go the distance.

Council members Mo Delgado and Kaleem Shabazz, along with James Whitehead are planning to run.

Independent Geoff Rosenberg has already submitted his candidate petition.

And, finally, don’t forget about current Mayor Marty Small.

Small has placed himself from prohibitive favorite, to quite endangered.

Small had an almost instant falling-out with Craig Callaway, who had enthusiastically supported Small’s ascent to Mayor.

Callaway has promised that Small will not receive the Atlantic City Democratic Party endorsement.

It can be done, but, it’s very difficult to win in Atlantic City off of the regular Democratic party line.

Former Mayor Lorenzo Langford, Tibbitt and Delgado did in the past. But, it’s the stuff that Unicorns are made from.

There are a number of Republicans planning to run. But, they are waiting for the ballot question to play out first.

Should the ballot question pass, it changes everything.

The Mayor - Council form of government would change to a Council- Manager format.

Also, it would change Atlantic City from a partisan format to non-partisan.

Elections would take place in May and not on first Tuesday in November. This would have a major impact on county-wide elections going forward.

The electoral/political intrigue in Atlantic City is approaching fever pitch levels.

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