An 18-year-old from Pemberton is charged with murder and attempted murder in connection with a double shooting in Browns Mills.

According to the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, Kai Johnson fatally shot 17-year-old Malachi Treherne and wounded a 17-year-old female during the incident on the night of October 18.

Johnson turned himself into police in Pemberton on Friday, officials said. He had an initial appearance Saturday afternoon in Superior Court.

According to the prosecutor's office, Johnson and Treherne were having an argument inside a house on the 100 block of Snow Avenue when Johnson pulled out a gun and shot both victims. Police were called to the scene at approximately 11:35 p.m.

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Treherne died as a result of two shots to the head. The female was shot in the chest and has since been released from the hospital. There were other people inside the home at the time of the shooting, including a 2-year-old boy, but they were unharmed.

Johnson was charged with first-degree murder, first-degree attempted murder, first-degree aggravated assault, second-degree unlawful possession of a weapon, second-degree possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose, and third-degree endangering the welfare of a child.

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