... Seven in 10 U.S. White-Collar Workers Are Still Working Remotely.

It’s a case of the law of unintended consequences.

Here is more evidence that remote working is here to stay.

A newly released Gallup poll has concluded that 1/2 of Americans want to continue to work from home.

What started as a necessity because of the COVID-19 pandemic, has turned into something that workers would like to make permanent.

Most American employees have been working at home during the pandemic — but the numbers vary widely depending on what kind of job is involved, a Gallup poll found.

The survey of 7,272 adults was conducted during the six-month period from October 2020 to April 2021.

An average 52% of all workers did either all or part of their job at home, including 72% of those in white-collar occupations versus only 14% in blue-collar occupations.

The poll found that four in 10 white-collar workers would like to stay with the remote practice.

8 in 10 occupation categories have worked remotely during the pandemic. They are:

Computer-oriented or math fields (86%); Life, physical or social services (86%); Arts, design, entertainment and media (81%) and financial services, insurance, real estate and consulting services (80%)

The numbers dropped sharply in the following job classifications as follows:

Sales (36%); Healthcare (33%); construction and mining (16%); Installation, maintenance and repair (15%); Transportation (14%); Service workers (9%) and Manufacturing and production (8%)

There was basically no difference in responses by gender, with 41% of men and 39% of women in white collar positions say they would like to continue to work remotely from home.

Among blue-collar workers, women were more likely than men to stay remote.

“As leaders make important decisions about what happens next, the data suggests that hybrid approaches will be the much safer bet for companies hoping to retain and attract employees in fields we are 70% or more of their workers have grown a custom to working from home, and wear a third or more are reluctant to give that up,“ the Gallup posters wrote.

The margin of error for the entire poll is plus or minus two percentage points.

SOURCE: Gallup poll.

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