Brandon Brown, the inspiration for an anti-Joe Biden chant, may make it onto the ballot in New Jersey, sort of.

A perennial political candidate has filed a petition to run in the Republican primary in New Jersey's 4th congressional district using the line "Let's Go Brand*n - FJB."

Robert Shapiro submitted his petition to run against incumbent Chris Smith and four other Republican candidates in a district that has been heavily gerrymandered as part of the recent redistricting. None of the candidates is considered a significant threat to Smith, who is seeking his 22nd term.

New Jersey Globe was the first to report that Shapiro just barely qualified, with 203 petition signatures. 200 valid signatures are required to run.  The slim margin of signatures could trigger a challenge to try and get Shaprio's petition invalidated.

Get our free mobile app

It is, however, Shapiro's slogan that is likely to draw the most attention.

Ultimately, it will be up to New Jersey Secretary of State Tahesha Way to decide if the candidate's slogan will be rejected. Given the not-so-subtle reference to foul language, it is hard to believe Sec. Way will not strike it from the ballot.

"Let's go Brandon" has become a rallying cry for many anti-Biden Americans. Its origin was at a race in 2021 at Talladega Superspeedway. During an interview with winning driver Brandon Brown, fans began chanting "F Joe Biden." The reporter conducting the interview misinterpreted the chant, believing she was hearing "Let's go Brandon."

Facebook/Brandon Brown
Facebook/Brandon Brown
loading...

New Jersey state election law requires individuals whose name would be included in any slogan or ballot line to grant written permission for the name to be used.

New Jersey's new congressional districts for the 2020s

A district-by-district look at New Jersey's congressional map following the redistricting done after the 2020 Census.

Where NJ's 'red wave' of the 2021 election was reddest

In 2017, Gov. Phil Murphy won the election by 14.1 percentage points, a margin exceeding 303,000. His re-election was much closer, an 84,000-vote, 3.2-point victory. He and others talked about a ‘red wave’ of Republican voters in the electorate, and certified results show which counties turned red most.