… POLISTINA IS OFFICIALLY ON THE JOB!

I absolutely love this.

New Jersey State Senator Vince Polistina, R-2 is not waiting for Trenton political bureaucrats to give him “permission” to be Atlantic County’s top elected state official.

Polistina is already on the job.

Senator Polistina has announced that his Legislative office is open and staffed to assist with any variety of needs faced by the residents of Atlantic County.  The office can be reached at (609) 677-8266.

We caught up with Senator Polistina, who is wasting no time implementing constituent services to the residents of Atlantic County.

“It is important to me to make sure the residents know that the office will continue in its mission of helping people,” said Polistina.

“I have been selected to continue Senator Brown’s legacy of assisting Atlantic County’s hard-working middle-class families and retirees with issues related to unemployment, the Motor Vehicle Commission, Veterans Affairs matters, whatever they may need. As State Senator, I will be doing that job regardless of when the swearing-in ceremony takes place.”

“Anyone who needs to speak with me, or has issues they need help with, can also reach out to me directly on my personal cell phone at (609) 432-1564.”

“My role as State Senator means more to me about the people than the politics, whenever Assemblyman Mazzeo’s party turns over the keys to the office to me is irrelevant. I am committed to doing the necessary work as the Senator whether paid for it or not,” concluded Polistina.

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