It's been a week since Tropical Storm Ida ravaged parts of the Garden State. Now, New Jersey has partnered with the two biggest rideshare companies to offer transportation to residents who lost their vehicles.

Flooding and tornados generated by Ida caused so much damage here in New Jersey. Certainly, some cars and trucks were totaled by water, fallen trees, or picked up and thrown elsewhere.

In an effort to help those affected get to where they need to go, NJ Governor Phil Murphy announced this week that the state (along with United Way Worldwide and NJ 211) will join with Lyft and Uber to offer free and discounted rides, Patch.com reports.

In a recent statement, Lyft Social Impact Director Lisa Boyd said, "Nobody should have to worry after a natural disaster how they will get to essential places like the grocery store and medical appointments. Lyft is proud to join Governor Murphy in helping New Jerseyans get where they need to go until they can get back on their feet."

The offer is reportedly good for the next two weeks.

Get our free mobile app
Getty Images

If you're someone in need of a free or discounted rideshare because your vehicle was destroyed by Tropical Storm Ida, text the word NJIDARIDE to 898-211 to request an Uber or Lyft.

If you don't have a smartphone, you can simply dial 2-1-1 from any phone.

The state reminds riders there are a few restrictions, but any questions can be directed to 2-1-1.

We hope this info is beneficial to you or someone you know who may need the assistance.

8 ways to battle the spotted lanternfly in NJ

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

10 Exotic Animals That Are Legal To Own In New Jersey

Who woulda thought?