Two years before Phil Murphy won the election to become our Governor in 2017 and long before most people ever heard of him, I predicted he would be our next Governor.

I had no idea he would anoint himself Emperor or king, as he's done for almost a year now. All you had to do was read up on who was spending money where and what power players in Trenton were doing or not doing.

The popular opinion is that Murphy will win re-election later this year, with his vast wealth and secured endorsement of the state's most powerful public union, the NJEA. With the teacher's union under fire for not going to work when most people want their kids back in school, maybe their endorsement is not the treasure and rock-solid seal of approval that it is in most years.

Also factor in the reality that the most prevalent concern amongst the public these days is the coronavirus. It is a fact that New Jersey has the highest per capita percentage of COVID deaths in the nation, and his opponents will exploit this little detail to their advantage. The website Politico points out that he is the only governor in the country running for re-election and his handling of the pandemic will be used against him.

So far, he has been able to fool and soothe the public with his thrice weekly dog and pony shows on TV with his seemingly deep concern for keeping us all safe from this rarely deadly, albeit serious virus. While simultaneously killing the economy and our future, he manages to convey his control of the situation and his sincere compassion.

The only thing he is sincerely compassionate about is power. Keeping it and wielding it is truly his main concern. If enough people can see that and a worthy opponent can convince enough voters of that, then there is a chance. Pray for any competent opposition to lead the charge from any party to do that well enough and it just might happen. Smart money isn't on that bet, but longshots do occasionally happen, and in "these unprecedented times", nothing is too far-fetched to become a reality.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

COMPARE: Highest 2020 property taxes in each county