We learned from a fellow Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia member, Sandee Bengel that broadcasting legend and trailblazer Trudy Haynes has passed away at the age of 95.

Ms. Haynes, who was born on November 23, 1926 made broadcasting history in August, 1965 as Philadelphia and The Delaware Valley’s first African-American television reporter.

Ms. Haynes retired in December, following an iconic 33-year career at KYW-TV, Channel 3.

I had the privilege to get to know Ms. Haynes at various Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia events. She was a kind and wonderful person, who supported her colleagues and the industry at a profound level.

The archives of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia confirm that … “In the early 50's she was the first African-American poster model for Lucky Strike cigarettes. She entered broadcasting in 1956 as women's editor at WCHB Radio in Inkster, Michigan and hosted a 90-minute daily program for women.”

Here is a short list of some of the countless interviews that Ms. Haynes conducted during her legendary career.

  • President Lyndon Johnson
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
  • Sylvester Stallone
  • Denzel Washington
  • Tupac Shakur

When Ms. Haynes was born, the 30th President of The United States, Calvin Coolidge was in office.

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Ms. Haynes lived through tumultuous times in American history; through the inequalities of racial segregation, and it would be more than 35 years until the Civil Rights movement would bring about positive changes in America.

Ms. Haynes was a giant of the broadcasting industry in so many important ways.

Viewers throughout The Delaware Valley loved her for decades.

In 1999, Trudy Haynes was inducted into the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia's covered “Hall of Fame.”

SOURCES: Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia and Sandee Bengel.

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