There has been market saturation level reporting about the British COVID-19 variant. All of the coverage has been devoted to advising that it is much more contagious and severe.

While it is more transmissible, it appears to not be more severe ... which is very welcome news as concerns about the UK and Brazil variants have created much concern.

According to a New study published in a medical journal called The Lancet Infectious Diseases yesterday declares otherwise.

The British strain is known as B.1.1.7 and it was discovered late last year.

It is presently the most common strain in The United States, making this information even more important.

The British study analyzed 496 COVID-19 patients who were in British hospitals in November and December, 2020.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases study “found no difference in risks of severe disease, death, or other clinical outcomes in patients with B.1.1.7 and other variants.”

The researchers also said that “our data, within the context and limitations of a real world study, provide initial reassurance that severity and hospitalized patients with B .1.1.7 is not markedly different from severity in those without,“ the researchers said in the study.

In a separate published study in The Lancet Public Health medical journal, there is still more good news.

The study confirms that the existing vaccines “were likely to be affective against the British variant since there was no apparent increase in reinfection rate when compared to non-UK variants,” quoting the separate study.

British scientists have determined that the British variant is about 40% to 70% more transmissible, as compared to the previous dominant variants.

As positive cases in 5 states (led by Michigan, New York and New Jersey), the results of these important studies are welcome positive news.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is now recommending that the state of Michigan reimplement total lockdowns, which they did for more than 70 days last year.

SOURCES: The Lancet Infectious Diseases and The Lancet Public Health medical journal.

Get our free mobile app