If you are a middle-of-the-road person and not that interested in politics then you are exactly who I need to speak with.

Many Democrats and unaffiliated voters don't like politics and don't want to be involved. The problem is that as fewer and fewer people engage in the process, the radicals on both sides are empowered.

One of the biggest consequences of the low turnout during elections and the lack of participation of average people is the poor choices left within the general election.

How often do you hear "the lesser of two evils" or "at least he's a little better than the other guy"?

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If you are a registered Democrat, then you are likely feeling the heat more than most. To watch the party of your parents and grandparents embrace such radical policies as normalizing porn in grade school and sexualizing the curriculum for kids who still believe in Santa Claus must be especially troubling.

Beyond that, it's the Trenton Democrats who have been in charge for two decades in the Legislature, and spending and taxes continue to spiral out of control.

Christie Todd Whitman speaks during the virtual Democratic National Convention
Christie Todd Whitman speaks during the virtual Democratic National Convention (NBC News via YouTube)
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The Republicans are certainly not blameless as former Gov. Christine Whitman sacked the pension system to "pay for" her tax cuts and Gov. Christie empowered the NJEA and blew up the debt all in an effort to run for president and leave Jersey behind.

Truly, the politics in our state are a mess. The answer is to recognize that we do have a two-party system and it's unlikely that the Democrats can shake the radicals anytime soon so that leaves the GOP.

The way to fix the state is to flood the GOP primaries with unaffiliated voters who show up on election day, June 7, and cast a vote for the outsider candidate. If you like, you can immediately return to unaffiliated by filling out this form.

Every NJ city and town's municipal tax bill, ranked

A little less than 30 cents of every $1 in property taxes charged in New Jersey support municipal services provided by cities, towns, townships, boroughs and villages. Statewide, the average municipal-only tax bill in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from more than $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to $9.22 billion in municipal purpose taxes, special taxing districts that in some places provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development levied $323.8 million in 2021.

School aid for all New Jersey districts for 2022-23

The state Department of Education announced district-level school aid figures for the 2022-23 school year on Thursday, March 10, 2022. They're listed below, alphabetically by county. For additional details from the NJDOE, including specific categories of aid, click here.